The Gut-Brain Connection

The Gut-Brain Connection


How the gut and the brain communicate has
fascinated us for centuries. The gut-brain axis transforms information
via the vagus nerve from food to feelings. Once eaten, digested food particles enter
the small intestine, which is covered with a velvety layer of villi. Each villus is lined with a single layer of
epithelium. This layer is made up of different cell types. One of them, the enteroendocrine cell, is
unlike the others. It is our gut sensor. In addition to communicating through hormones,
we discovered that enteroendocrine cells also synapse with nerves, including the vagus nerve. We call those enteroendocrine cells synapsing
with nerves neuropod cells. They sense and react to their environment. They sense mechanical, thermal and chemical
stimuli such as nutrients or bacterial byproducts in the gut lumen. Inside neuropod cells, signals from stimuli
are converted into tiny electrical pulses. These pulses propagate via synapses on to
the efferent neuron of the vagus nerve. Vagul neurons carry the sensory information
to the brain stem, linking the signals generated inside the small intestine to the brain. The neuropod cell connection with the vagus
nerve serves as a conduit for food in the gut to influence brain function within seconds. This connection is also a potential portal
for gut pathogens to access the brain. This new knowledge is a foundation for designing
therapies to treat disorders related to altered gut-brain signaling.

Comments

(21 Comments)

  • Ali Karami

    great finding

  • Sure Expansion

    I see you shared the embed link. I'll use it for my website. Lmk if thats okay. If not, i recommend not sharing the embed link. Thanks

  • Dr Janelle Sinclair

    The imagery on this video are fantastic! Fascinating video, and it really does show how the brain and gut are interconnected. When people have depression and/or anxiety, they really should look at their gut health. Thanks for sharing!

  • Tina Cudal

    Who ever dislike this video probably doesn't have a healthy gut.

  • vag tao

    Nice education about Gut-Brain analysis. As per this video it's a new knowledge. This is western science opinion. It's an old knowledge for ancient Indians more than 2000 year old knowledge in Ayurveda. Refer Sushrutha Samhithe by Sushrutha the first surgeon in the world.

  • Adrien Alcantara

    Could this be possible cause for anxiety?

  • Show Cat

    Why the deep roaring noise during narration? Hard to her what she is saying.

  • Hana Tesfaye

    Wow

  • ryan hogan

    One of those cells is not like the others!

  • Kevin Alix

    Can you elaborate on your statement of the Vegas nerve as a pathway to the brain for gut pathogens?

  • sita lakshmi

    Amazing findings

  • Peter Goettler

    Yes,Thxs.

  • LIFE RENU

    How can I improve gut health? Do you have any natural supplement for gut health?

  • Ivan Bryan

    I just ate rotten meat. I am now one with nature and the timeless force of creation. I am eternal

  • Fakirswamy Basava

    Simply wow,human body and its functioning is fascinating,it's like a universe ,mysterious

  • Peter J. Goettler

    Interesting To Note! Thxs.

  • James Joseph KEATING 4 th

    Parasites 🦠 we become what we eat and what we eat has eaten

  • clash with sam

    I was facing nervousness problem,and my stomach area was palpitating like heart,so I thought what is the relation between gut and nervous system

  • Mehnaz Safeer

    Marvelous

  • Elaine R

    This video is very short but informative. I have heard of the gut to brain connection in the past but never read up or researched it. However, after watching this video, I am definately going to watch/read more about this subject. Definately recommend this video. Give it a go only 2 minutes of your life.

  • Mr K Lakhan

    Was around in yesterday's pseudo science – sattvik food concept – but thanks for providing it in today's science.

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