Intro to Nutrition #56: Pros and Cons of Pasteurization! WEIGHT LOSS TIPS From Holistic Health Coach

Intro to Nutrition #56: Pros and Cons of Pasteurization! WEIGHT LOSS TIPS From Holistic Health Coach


Pasteurization is the process of heating a
liquid to below the boiling point to destroy harmful pathogens in it. It was developed in 1856 by Louis Pasteur,
initially to prevent fermented wine from spoiling. It wasn’t until the late 1800s that milk
was commercially pasteurized. Europe adopted pasteurization first, followed
by the United States in the early 1900s. The need for milk pasteurization arose because
of increased production and distribution with poor sanitary conditions, which led to
outbreaks of milk borne illnesses, including typhoid fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria
diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal diseases. The original pasteurization method, known
as vat pasteurization, simply involved heating milk, or other liquids,
in a large tank for at least 30 minutes. When you drink milk that has gone through
the pasteurization process, you’re basically getting a “dead” beverage
that is lacking in nutrients. It denatures milk by altering its chemical
structure, and destroys enzymes like lactase, galactase,
and phosphatase, essential for the assimilation of nutrients
like lactose, galactose, and phosphate. Without these, milk becomes very difficult
to digest. In fact, the lack of lactase in pasteurized
milk can contribute to lactose intolerance. Unfortunately, the pancreas cannot produce
these enzymes, so it becomes overstressed. Pasteurization also diminishes the vitamins
in milk, such as vitamins B6, B12, and vitamin C, and
kills beneficial bacteria essential in digestion. Furthermore, the pathogenic bacteria killed
by pasteurization are not removed, so their dead cell fragments remain in the
milk, igniting immune reactions that can cause milk
allergies.

Comments

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *